A Researcher Live Series

Flow Cytometry

 

Listen to top experts discussing the latest innovations in Flow Cytometry

#FlowCytometryLive

Previous sessions

To listen to previous sessions, click on the titles below.

Topic Date
Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles by Flow Cytometry with Dr André Görgens, Karolinska Institutet 23rd March, 10am GMT
Critical Role of Flow Cytometry in Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Laboratories with Prof D. Robert Sutherland, University of Toronto 28th March, 5pm BST
DNA Analysis by Flow Cytometry with Derek Davies, Francis Crick Institute 30th March, 5pm BST

 


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Join our speakers for discussions and Q&A about their latest research and discoveries


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Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles by Flow Cytometry with Dr André Görgens, Karolinska Institutet

 

André Görgens obtained his PhD in hematopoietic stem cell biology at the University Hospital Essen in the lab of Prof. Bernd Giebel. Afterwards, he became interested in intercellular communication and particularly extracellular vesicles. He is currently a researcher in the lab of Samir El Andaloussi at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, working on using Flow Cytometry to exploit Extracellular Vesicle heterogeneity for the advancement of therapy and diagnostics.

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Critical Role of Flow Cytometry in Stem Cell Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Laboratories with Prof D. Robert Sutherland, University of Toronto

A professor at the University of Toronto, Prof Sutherland has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles, 15 Reviews, and 15 Technical Monographs. He is an expert in CD34+ cell enumeration and detection of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria by flow cytometry. He became an Assistant Professor in 1989 (Dept of Medicine, University of Toronto), Associate Professor in 1997, and Full Professor in 2009. His early research interests included studying the structural characteristics of variety of cell surface molecules associated with normal and malignant cellular phenotypes including CD34. His work studying the CD34 antigen led to the development of a new Flow Cytometric method to enumerate CD34+ cells. In 1996 this method evolved into a clinical Guideline for ISHAGE (Int’l Soc Hematotherapy and Graft Evaluation). The ‘single platform’ variant of the ISHAGE Guidelines is the most widely used method Worldwide to assess graft adequacy in the Bone Marrow Transplant setting and is embodied in several National and International Guidelines for graft assessment by Flow Cytometry. This work led to the Wallace H. Coulter Distinguished Lecture Award in 2006, “to recognize lifetime contribution to the science, education and practice of Clinical Cytometry.” As Technical Director of the UHN Clinical Flow Cytometry Laboratory at Toronto General Hospital, he develops new Flow Cytometric assays for deployment in the clinical laboratory. His group developed assays for the detection of Glyco-phosphatidyl-inositol (GPI)-linked structures that are lacking in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria and related disorders like Aplastic Anemia. His group recently developed standardised highly sensitive flow assays to detect this disease on a variety of instrument types.


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DNA Analysis by Flow Cytometry with Derek Davies, Francis Crick Institute

Derek is a National STP Training Lead at The Francis Crick Institute. He has been involved in Cytometry since 1980. After an initial grant-funded project looking at DNA and protein content in cervical cells, he moved to a core facility at what was the Imperial Cancer Research Fund in London. In 1996, he became the Head of the Facility which at the time had 3 sorters and 3 analysers and a staff of 3. In 2002, the ICRF became Cancer Research UK’s London Research Institute and the facility grew providing analysis, sorting and image cytometry. In 2015 the London Research Institute merged with the National Institute for Medical Research and became the Francis Crick Institute. He oversaw the transition of two flow facilities to the new Institute which now contains 30 cytometers – traditional flow cytometers, imaging flow cytometers and mass cytometers, and has a staff of 12. In early 2019 he moved into a more wide-reaching role and is responsible for training in all the Francis Crick Institute’s Core Facilities (or Science Technology Platforms).